First and Last Freezes in West Virginia

West Virginia's diverse climate allows a multitude of crops to prosper in the region. The top 5 crops in the state are 1) Hay (608,000 acres), 2) Corn (35,000 acres), Soybeans (20,000 acres), Corn (15,000 acres), and apples (4,800 acres). In fact, hay makes up one out of every 25 acres in West Virginia.

With a highly varied geography, West Virginia has a diverse growing season, depending on location. The following maps illustrate this diversity:


First Freeze

This map represents the average date of the first freezing temperature. This date ranges from mid September in eastern Tucker and Randolph counties, to late September across the rest of the northern mountain area of West Virginia. The first freezing temperature usually occurs by early October in the rest of eastern and north central West Virginia, to mid and late October across southwest West Virginia, southeast Ohio, and extreme southwest Virginia.


Last Freeze

This map represents the average date of the start of the growing season. This date ranges from late May in the extreme northern West Virginia mountain counties, to early and mid May across the rest of eastern and north central West Virginia. The last freezing temperature usually occurs by late April across southwest West Virginia, southeast Ohio, and extreme southwest Virginia.